BMSB Seasonal Measures 2023/2024

What is BMSB?

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB)

  • Known as the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB)
  • Exotic to Australia and origins from Asia, North America, Europe, Oceania and South America
  • Described as a shield shaped marbled bug up to 17 mm long that eats crops and ornamental plants

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is a Halyomorpha halys and belongs to the Pentatomidae family.  Native to China, Japan, Korea and other Asian countries, it is now a pest that can enter from Asia, North America, Europe, Oceania, South America and the list continues to grow.

BMSB is shield shaped, mottled brown with a smooth rounded shoulder.  It can grow up to 17 mm long and feeds on crops and ornamental plants.  The bug produces an unpleasant odour when crushed.

BMSB is exotic to Australia and must be kept out. 

Why is BMSB a concern?

BMSB poses a significant risk to Australia’s agriculture

  • Damages agricultural crops, fruits, nursery stock and ornamental plants
  • Feeds on over 300 plant species
  • A smelly nuisance in homes and buildings
  • Hitchhike on imported goods

BMSB is exotic to Australia and must be kept out.  They hitchhike on imported goods, including personal items, machinery, vehicles, ships, boats and aircraft.

The bugs damage agriculture crops, nursery stock and ornamental plants.  They feed on over 300 plant species, including sweet corn, tree nuts and fruits such as apricots, figs, apples, peaches and citrus.

The bugs pierce through the skin/surface of fruits and inject saliva, feeding on the juices of the fruit. This leaves dimpling on the externals, rotting and corking of the insides of the fruit. If impacted fruit is used for juice production, it could ruin the entire batch.

Who does BMSB affect?

There are seasonal measures that affect importers of targeted goods from targeted countries

  • New Zealand and Australian importers of;
  • Targeted goods from;
  • Target risk countries and;
  • Shipped via Seafreight between;
  • 01 September 2023 to 30 April 2024 (inclusive)

BMSB seasonal measures affect importers of targeted goods that are manufactured in or shipped from target risk countries, and have shipped via seafreight between 01 September and 30 April(inclusive).  BMSB measures also apply to vessels that berth, load or tranship from target risk countries within the same period.

What are the BMSB seasonal measures?

Seasonal measures include specific treatment methodologies which are subjective to different types of sea cargo

  • Target high risk goods require mandatory treatment
  • Target risk goods are subject to random inspection
  • Standard FCL & LCL can be treated offshore or onshore
  • Breakbulk must be treated offshore only
  • Heat, Methyl Bromide and Sulfuryl Fluoride treatment only
  • Specific packing requirements to be followed

Goods that are classed as target high risk require mandatory treatment.  Goods that are classed as target risk are subject to random inspection.  Goods that are not targeted are not subject to BMSB measures unless packed with targeted goods.

Target high risk goods must be treated by an ‘approved’ treatment provider.  Treatment certificates will not be accepted from treatment providers that are unregistered, suspended, withdrawn or under review.

Standard FCL and LCL consignments can be treated offshore or onshore, whereas Breakbulk must be treated offshore only.

  • LCL must be treated at the container level
  • Breakbulk (includes Open Top, Flat Rack and Modified Containers) will be directed for export if not treated offshore

Treatment options currently include Heat Treatment, Methyl Bromide Fumigation and Sulfuryl Fluoride Fumigation.

Treated consignments maybe subject to random verification inspections.

There are specific packing requirements that allow treatments to work effectively.  Consignments that are not packed to the required standard will be directed to a 4.7 depot for a complete unpack and fumigation, which may require to perforate packaging.

Who are the target risk countries?

There are many countries that have been identified as Target Risk and Emerging Risk

  • There is a list of Target Risk Countries that are subject to BMSB measures for targeted goods
  • There is a list of Emerging Risk Countries that may be selected for random onshore inspection
  • These lists are subject to change and continuous review

Target Risk Countries currently include Albania – Andorra – Armenia – Austria – Azerbaijan – Belgium – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Bulgaria – Canada – Croatia – Czechia – France – Japan (heightened vessel surveillance only) – Georgia – Germany – Greece – Hungary – Italy – Kazakhstan – Kosovo – Liechtenstein – Luxembourg – Montenegro – Moldova – Netherlands – Poland – Portugal – Republic of North Macedonia – Romania – Russia – Serbia – Slovakia – Slovenia – Spain – Switzerland – Turkey – Ukraine – United States of America – Uzbekistan.

Emerging Risk Countries currently include United Kingdom and China – Target High Risk goods do not require mandatory treatment, however subject to increased intervention through random inspection.

What are the targeted goods?

Goods that fall within the following tariff classifications have been categorised as Target High Risk Goods or Target Risk Goods

Target High Risk Goods include;

44 – Wood and articles of wood; wood charcoal

45 – Cork and articles of cork

57 – Carpets and other textile floor coverings

68 – Articles of stone, plaster, cement, asbestos, mica or similar materials

69 – Ceramic products

70 – Glass and glass ware

72 – Iron and steel

73 – Articles of iron or steel

74 – Copper and articles thereof

75 – Nickel and articles thereof

76 – Aluminium and articles thereof

78 – Lead and articles thereof

79 – Zinc and articles thereof

80 – Tin and articles thereof

81 – Other base metals; cermets; articles thereof

82 – Tools, implements, cutlery, spoons and forks, of base metal; parts thereof of base metal

Target Risk Goods include;

27 – Mineral fuels, mineral oils and products of their distillation; bituminous substances; mineral waxes

28 – Inorganic chemicals; organic or inorganic compounds of precious metals, of rare-earth metals, of radioactive elements or of isotopes

29 – Organic chemicals

38 – Miscellaneous chemical products

39 – Plastics and articles

40 – Rubber and articles thereof

48 – Paper and paperboard; articles of paper pulp, of paper or of paperboard

49 – Printed books, newspapers, pictures and other products of the printing industry; manuscripts, typescripts and plans

56 – Wadding, felt and nonwovens; special yarns; twine, cordage, ropes and cables and articles thereof

Heat Treatment

Heat treatment is one of the three approved options for BMSB treatment

Heat treatment by an ‘approved’ provider can be used for all good types and sizes.

  • 56°C or higher at the coldest surface of the goods, for a minimum of 30 minutes, or;
  • for individual goods weighing less than 3000 kg shipped as break bulk only, 60°C or higher at the coldest surface of the goods, for a minimum of 10 minutes

Note: Individual goods shipped as break bulk weighing less than 3000kg treated at 60°C for 10 minutes require evidence within shipping documentation that they are less than 3000kg for these treatments to be accepted.

Methyl Bromide Fumigation

Methyl Bromide Fumigation is one of the three approved options for BMSB treatment

Fumigation using Methyl Bromide by an ‘approved’ provider can be used.

  • A dose of 24 g/m³ or above, at 10°C or above, for a minimum of 12 hours (but less than 24 hours), and a minimum end point reading of 12 g/m³, or;
  • A dose of 24 g/m³ or above, at 10°C or above, for 24 hours or longer, and a minimum end point reading of 8 g/m³

Note:

  • All start time concentration readings must be above 24 g/m³.
  • Dose increases to compensate for temperatures less than 10°C is NOT permitted.
  • Topping up with additional fumigant at the end of treatment is NOT permitted.
  • If the concentration of fumigant falls below the minimum end point reading at any point during the treatment, the treatment has failed.

Sulfuryl Fluoride Fumigation

Sulfuryl Fluoride Fumigation is one of the three approved options for BMSB treatment

Fumigation using Sulfuryl Fluoride by an ‘approved’ provider can be used.

  • A dose of 24 g/m³ or above, at 10°C or above, for a minimum of 12 hours (but less than 24 hours), and a minimum end point reading of 12 g/m³, or;
  • A dose of 24 g/m³ or above, at 10°C or above, for 24 hours or longer, and a minimum end point reading of 8 g/m³

Note:

  • All start time concentration readings must be above 24 g/m³.
  • Dose increases to compensate for temperatures less than 10°C is NOT permitted.
  • Topping up with additional fumigant at the end of treatment is NOT permitted.
  • If the concentration of fumigant falls below the minimum end point reading at any point during the treatment, the treatment has failed.

Packing Requirements

There are specific packing requirements that allow treatments to work effectively

  • Containers must be packed to allow sufficient free air space for fumigation gasses or heat treatment
  • Plastic wrapping must be clearly perforated
  • Detailed packing requirements can be found on the fumigation methodology document

There must be free space throughout the container to allow the fumigant or heat treatment to freely circulate around the target of the fumigation and to permit the positioning of sampling tubes.

The free air space requirements for effective treatment of a consignment will vary depending on the commodity and the method of packing.  As a guide, there should be at least 350 mm of free airspace in total, including 200 mm free air space above the commodity, 50 mm below and the remaining 100 mm at the sides and between the commodities, with a maximum load factor of 80%.

Where commodities are stacked on the floor there must be sufficient free air space between individual items to allow the treatment to reach throughout the entire enclosure.

If there is insufficient space to allow the monitoring tubes to be positioned according to AFAS requirements, then it is also unlikely that there will be enough free air space in the fumigation enclosure to allow for an effective fumigation.

Plastic wrapping must be clearly perforated to allow for effective treatment.

Untreated timber products must have at least one physical dimension which is less than 200 mm thick.

Where timber is the target of the fumigation it must be separated by a minimum of 5 mm of airspace every 200 mm (Basically holes or slashing every 20 cm. This separation can be horizontal or vertical).

How to get more information

If you would like to organise a time to speak with us and discuss these measures in more detail or prepare a BMSB Seasonal Plan, please contact AM Logistics.